Orange is the new yellow

 

When we talk about colours, the right place to find answers is PANTONE:

”A red-based orange, 17-1462 Flame, is gregarious and fun loving. Flamboyant and vivacious, this wonderfully theatrical shade adds fiery heat to the spring 2017 palette.”

Spring 2017?? Even if we are in autumn already, fashion shows might just got a head start. Designers can only try to predict the next popular fabrics or colours, but in the end it remains our decision whether to make it or not the next ”must have”.

In similar notes, in the PANTONE’s Spring 2018 Fashion Colour Trend Report for LFW and NYFW this Cherry Tomato emerged:

”Impulsive Cherry Tomato is a tempestuous orangey red that exudes heat and energy. Demanding attention, this courageous, never to be ignored shade is viscerally alive.”

 

Everybody is talking about these bright oranges and my expectations are that yellow is now being replaced. Even if I really fancied this honney-lemon-mustard colour, it was about time for another change. Last year, but especially last few months, we certainly saw a lot of yellow, from that faux leather jacket that every blogger owned to the bright shoes and shirts. Since then, everybody has adopted this colour and all so-called ”daring” outfits have faded away in the crowd because of its commonly. Yellow is for sure the colour of fall/winter 16 and beyond, but now every trendsetter should move on to the next craze.

While my two suggestions look very much alike and they are only one year apart from each other, they might be your ”get out of the comfort zone” ticket. As we are all looking for some sort of vote of confidence, a bright colour might be the niftiest answer.

Would you dare?

You can find my shopping recommendations at the bottom of this article.

 

 

PHOTOS BY COSMIN MAJA.

I only use affiliate links to share my favourites.

ASICS sneakers – ZARA jeans – H&M socks – TOMMY H. belt

Accessories from On Point.

Use my dicount code ”VIRGILGOD” for -15% at Daniel Wellington.

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